Books
  • Furious Lullaby (Crab Orchard Series in Poetry)
    Furious Lullaby (Crab Orchard Series in Poetry)
  • Names Above Houses (Crab Orchard Series in Poetry)
    Names Above Houses (Crab Orchard Series in Poetry)
  • A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology of Contemporary Persona Poetry
    A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology of Contemporary Persona Poetry

  • Requiem for the Orchard (Akron Series in Poetry)
    Requiem for the Orchard (Akron Series in Poetry)

Anthologies

Oliver's work can also be found in the following anthologies.

  • Tilting the Continent: Southeast Asian American Writing
    Tilting the Continent: Southeast Asian American Writing
  • Asian American Poetry: The Next Generation
    Asian American Poetry: The Next Generation
  • Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond
    Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond
  • From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great
    From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great
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Grats to two sisters and a bro.  

Congratulations to Ate M. Evelina Galang for winning the AWP Award Series in the Novel.



Also congrats to Aimee Nezhukumatathil and Patrick Rosal for the honor of being finalists in the 7th annual Asian American Literary Awards.


It's here! It's here!

At last! The Moroccan rug Meredith and I purchased in Fez arrived today, courtesy of the United States Postal Service. There was a lot of hucksterism when we were there in May, so we were a bit concerned that the rug wouldn't arrive.



Anyway, it's a beautiful piece! Let me try to figure out how to post pictures and I'll show you one.

School days, school days.

I'm still not ready to start the semester. I've got my course materials ready and all that, but I'm not emotionally prepared to hop into the classroom just yet. If only there was another month of summer. What I really should be doing is trying to write, you know? Instead, I've been sucked in to watching the Olympics. I've actually been watching it on Canadian television. They broadcasters on that network had a very interesting perspective on the US Men's basketball team. During the win, one of the commentators suggested lamented a lot of the antics by the Americans on the court. Certainly, it's a perception that's following US citizens in other facets of international interactions.



Anyway, got my contributor copies of North American Review. Barbara Jane's got a poem it. It's VERY cool.



I'll probably go see Supersize Me with Mere tonight. Though what I really want to see is Hero, with Jet Li.

Some fat to chew on . . .

Victoria Chang wrote a response to the managing editor of Fence regarding a poem by Alicia Ostricker. I'm not going to summarize the statements, since I've kindly posted a link with both Victoria's and Eduardo's thorough discussion of the drama.



Anyway, this brings up a very interesting discussion about writers/artists of color and the use of stereotypical images. Ultimately the trouble with language is that there is so much history invested in a particular position's ability to speak. Representations of "Otherness" no matter how artistically or aesthetically accurate are inevitably problematic when generated by a person/group who is gazing.



I do want to add one tidbit to this discussion, though, and that is the idea that this is not only a debate about ethnicity, but we must add that it's also a generational issue. Ostriker's valuable book, Stealing the Language, might be considered, by some, to be dated in its feminist position. But of course, depending on who you are, the issues in that book are still very contemporary.



I'm going to refer back to what Eduardo said, because that's the crux of my position as well. Eduardo elegantly stated that " . . . this poem doesn't problematize the body of colonial literature: creative work written by a member of the dominant culture about a subaltern culture. The images of Mexican field workers or studious Asians in Ostriker's poem are dangerous because these images are yoked with specific intellectual & emotional abilities. Mexican immigrants=field workers=coarse intelligence=base morals=primitive culture." He also said that "if the Ostriker poem would've been written by a writer of color [he] probably wouldn't be objecting to its stereotypical images. This troubles [him]".



So what are we to do as artists, knowing that there is so much force behind the images we create? Knowing this, wouldn't it offer us a wider canvas when we are more judicious with the language we use? Or is this a limitation of an artist's range of possible subject matter? Does this create self-censorship?



Inevitably, the value of Ostriker's poem for my community is that it gets us talking about ourselves as artists. It's problematic to me, but it really makes me think about what I'm doing as a writer. I'm still troubled, but it's good to know that I'm not the only one.

Added some friends

Updated the linky links. You'll see our good friend Eduardo Corral and Victoria Chang added to the list. Welcome welcome!

Here it comes again . . . 

Yes, it's time for the start of the Fall semester once again. Meredith and I just got back from Oregon this weekend and already I've got a ton of work to do. As soon as we got back, we called Morocco. While I was over there in May, I purchased a Moroccan area rug. It's a gorgeous thing . . . you can flip it over and it'll have a different design. Anyway, with the move and all, it's been a headache coordinating everything. The bottom line is that I paid a lot of money for something that is not in my possession at the moment. The rug dealer reassured Meredith (she's the fluent French speaker) that the rug will be at our place by the end of the month. So cross your fingers.





By the way, have you guys seen Napoleon Dynamite? YOU MUST. That is all.

Home, Home on the Range

Meredith and I are off to Ontario, Oregon to visit my folks. She really wants to go inner-tubing down the Boise River, so I'll see what I can do. Outside of that, the temperature in Boise, ID, is slated to be in the 100's the whole time we're there! Yikes! I'm bringing my swim trunks and packing nothing but shorts.



By the way, our dear friend Pat Rosal has added links to his blogsite! Huzzah!

KUDOS Ate Evelina!

You'll be hearing more about this soon, but FYI . . . her novel has found a publisher! More details to follow. Congratulations to you, Ate. Well deserved after many years of hard hard work.